ISO base format: “ftyp” box

Curious clients like the ones we have in Panda are such a joy to work with. One of them sent us a great question about ftyp headers in MPEG-4.

ISO base media file format (aka MPEG-4 Part 12) is the foundation of a set of formats, MP4 being the most popular. It was inspired by the QuickTime’s format, an then generalized in an official ISO standard. Then other formats used this ISO spec as a base and added their own functionality (sometimes in an incompatible way). For example, when Adobe created F4V – the successor of FLV –  it used MPEG-4 Part 12 too but needed a way of packing ActionScript objects into the new format. Long story short,  F4V turned out a weird combination of MP4 and Flash.

Anyway, all MPEG4 Part 12 files consist of information units known as ‘boxes’. One of the kinds of these boxes is ftyp, which contains information about the variant of ISO-based format the file uses.  In general, every new variant should be registered on mp4ra.org, but that’s not always the case. Full list of possible ftyp values (registered and non-registered)  is maintained on ftyps.com website.

Majority of MP4 files produced by Panda will be labelled as ISOM (the most general label), but you might want to use a different label. Instead of ISOM you might for example use MP42, which is MP4 version 2 and does add a few things to the ISO base media file format, so different labels actually make sense.

These low-level MPEG4 Part 12 details can be easily manipulated using GPAC, which fortunately is available in Panda. Assuming that you’re already using raw neckbeard profiles, to change the ftyp of a file from ISOM to MP42 after it’s processed by FFmpeg, you could use following commands:

ffmpeg -i $input_file$ ... (your other FFmpeg arguments here) ... -y tmp.mp4
MP4Box -add tmp.mp4 -brand mp42 $output_file$

PS. Any time you’d like to use more than one command in a single Panda profile, join them either by ‘;’ or a newline.

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Panda Corepack-3 grows bigger and better

As you probably know you can create advanced profiles in Panda with custom commands to optimize your workflow. Since we are constantly improving our encoding tools an update could sometimes result in custom commands not working properly. Backwards compatibility can be tough to manage but we want to make sure we give you a way to handle this.

 

That’s why we made possible to specify which stack to use when creating new profile. Unfortunately, the newest one – corepack-3 – used to have only one tool, ffmpeg. It was obviously not enough and had to be fixed so we extended the list.

 

What’s in there you ask? Here’s short summary:

  • FFmpeg – a complete, cross-platform solution to record, convert and stream audio and video.
    http://ffmpeg.org
  • Segmenter Panda’s own segmenter that divides input file into smaller parts for HLS playlists.
  • Manifester – used to create m3u8 manifest files.

 

Of course, this list is not closed and we’ll be adding more tools as we go along. So, what would you like to see here?

 

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